STUDY | 
Health
 BEHAVIOR CHANGE

Testing the Senior Exercise Self-efficacy Project (SESEP) for use with urban dwelling minority older adults.

Resnick (2008)
Summary by 

To test the feasibility and effectiveness of the Senior Exercise Self-efficacy Project (SESEP). A feasibility study using a randomized control trial. The total sample included 166 persons, with a mean age of 73 years (SD=8.2 years), the majority of whom were female (81%), African American (72%), unmarried (86%), had at least a high school education (64%), and were retired (77%). There were 100 participants in the intervention group and 66 in the comparison group. The SESEP was a combined physical activity and efficacy-enhancing intervention for community-dwelling minority older adults. The primary outcomes included self-efficacy, outcome expectations, exercise, and overall physical activity, and the secondary outcomes were mental and physical health-related quality of life, depressive symptoms, pain, fear of falling, mobility, and chair rise time. Data were collected at baseline and following the 12-week intervention. There were statistically significant improvements in outcome expectations (p=.02), time spent in exercise (p=.04), and depressive symptoms (p=.02). Overall, there was a 77% rate of participation in classes. Although there was good participation in the SESEP among minority older adults, the primary outcomes were only minimally supported and there was even less support for the secondary outcomes.